ALS Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis BABESIA, LYME DSEASE TOP BEST RATED MD 54 BOOK/JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS TREATMENT
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ALS, UNTREATED BABESIA, UNTREATED BARTONELLA, UNTREATED LYME, ETC. IS GENETIC ALS VULNERABILITY INITIATED BY INFECTIONS?

BABESIA AND LYME DISEASE: ALS PROMOTERS OR CAUSES IN SOME PATIENTS?

Posted Jun 26 2009 7:11pm

After experiencing difficulty speaking during his nightly radio show, Charles McPhee was diagnosed with a bulbar (neck and throat) presentation of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), or Lou Gehrig's disease, on June 23, 2006. After researching the possible causes of ALS, Charles decided to treat his ALS with a combination of antibiotics (ceftriaxone, Flagyl, azithromycin) and anti-protozoals (Mepron and Malarone). His rationale for using them is based on proposed link between ALS and some infections, such as Babesia and Untreated Lyme Disease.

In a paper published October 22, 2006, Dr. David Martz of Colorado Springs, CO, outlined a harrowing journey through ALS... and back.

Dr. Martz is a past president of the Colorado medical society and seems to have worked as a respected clinician for many years, and had no plans to retire.

Yet after he was diagnosed in April of 2003, he was soon unable to drive, dress himself, or walk.

Over the next few months his health continued to deteriorate rapidly, and he was forced to retire from his medical practice. Eight months later, while bedridden and confined to a wheelchair, he learned from a friend who sent him a newspaper clipping that it was possible he really had been infected with infections carried by common tiny ticks found throughout North America.

After 6 negative tests for Lyme (late-stage Lyme is notoriously difficult to detect in the human body), an antibiotic-provoked urinary PCR test in December, 2003, finally showed positive for B. burgdorferi (Bb), the spirochete bacteria that causes Lyme disease.

Further, during a visual scan of his blood, rings around his red blood cells were also detected, indicating a probable co-infection with Babesia, malaria-like protozoa that are estimated to be transmitted in over 60% of Lyme infections.

Direct and indirect testing for Bartonella, the immune suppressing emerging infection carried by more vectors than any infection in the world [per Edward B. Breitschwerdt, DVM. Professor of Medicine and Infectious Diseases] is not known to have been performed or at what level of sophistication.

Based on this new information, Dr. Martz began using a combination of antibiotics and anti-protozoals to treat his ALS. He noticed dramatic improvement in his symptoms.

Within 12 weeks he was walking again without assistance, and in February, 2005, one year after initiating the antibiotic and anti-protozoal treatment, he was declared to be free of motor neuron disease by his neurologist, Steven A. Smith, M.D.

That same month Dr. Martz was fully recovered and once again began treating as a physician.

Modified from information from /www.dreamdoctor.com/radio/battle.shtml

[DR. SCHALLER NEITHER SUPPORTS NOR OPPOSES THIS MATERIAL. DISCUSS WITH YOUR WIDE READING RESEARCH-ORIENTED CLINICIANS TO SEE IF THIS HAS MERIT. HE DEFERS TO YOUR PERSONAL PHYSICIANS THE MEANING OF THIS PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. DR. SCHALLER HAS MET THIS PHYSICIAN, AND DID NOT NOTICE ANY CLEAR SIGNS OF ALS OR ANY OTHER NEUROLOGY DISEASE. BUT OBVIOUSLY, NO FULL NEUROLOGY EXAM WAS PERFORMED].


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