Dr James Schaller
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DOES YOUR STATE PROMOTE PAIN CARE
OR ARE THEY SADISTIC 1950'S MINDS?

An NIH expert panel concluded that:

"Regulatory barriers need to be revised to maximize convenience, benefit, and compliance..."

How can we get state medical boards, attorney generals and the "justice" department and the DEA to support pain treatment instead of suicide due to pain?

  • Pain management must be recognized as part of general medical practice
  • Medical use of opioids is recognized as legitimate professional practice
  • Pain management and full treatment of suffering is encouraged
  • Practitioners' concerns about state board and other attacks are addressed
  • Prescription amount alone is recognized as meaningless in determining the wisdom of a dose since long term treatment often requires very high dosing and is simplistic. No magical dose cut-offs exist to determine the legitimacy of prescribing,
  • Physical dependence or analgesic tolerance are not confused with "addiction," since the chronic use of a person with a worsening disease usually require a higher dose.

Fear which Promotes Pain From Big Brother Regulatory Scrutiny from State Medical Boards, Ignorant Addictionologists, Media-Hungry Attorney Generals, the Justice Department and Massive Federal DEA

Patients are Aware of the Facts and Fear:

"...I was openly accused of being an 'addict' and of falsely reporting chronic pain just to obtain prescription drugs." Some cancer patients refuse pain treatment for fear of becoming addicted."

"With everything that is out there with these medications, aren't you and your license in danger from prescribing this kind of medicine?"

Physician's fears that cause them to avoid pain care. These scared physicians erect massive steps for ill patients to jump through to be considered patients.

Some physicians report that concern about being investigated by regulatory and licensing agencies when prescribing opioid medications for patients, including those with cancer pain and chronic non-cancer pain, leads them to prescribe lower doses or quantities of pain medication and to authorize fewer refills.

Some physicians express concern that addiction or drug abuse will develop when prescribing to patients with cancer, or chronic non-cancer, pain. Some pharmacists lack knowledge of the crucial distinction between addiction, physical dependence, and tolerance.

Good Pain Care State Policies

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Alabama
Kansas
Nebraska
Massachusetts
New Mexico

Fair to Poor Pain States That Like to Terrorize Physicians and Promote Suicide Due to Poor Pain Care

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C+CD+D
Arkansas
Maryland
Michigan
Nevada
Oregon
South Carolina
Utah
Wisconsin
Alaska
California
Colorado
Idaho
Kentucky
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
New York
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
Wyoming
Arizona
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist. of Columbia
Georgia
Hawaii
Illinois
Indiana
Louisiana
New Hampshire
New Jersey
Rhode Island


States with Sadistic Pro-Pain Positions:

  • They restrict physician prescribing by limiting the amounts that can be prescribed or dispensed
  • They require special obnoxious over-bearing government-issued prescription forms
  • They stigmatize pain patients by confusing the use of drugs for pain with addiction
  • They prevent access to pain care if you have a history of substance abuse
  • They have ignorant and irrational fears that opioids are a last resort
  • They think everyone on an opioid for chronic pain will have a respiratory death from excess dosing.
  • They use 1950's outdated language that confuses pain patients with people who have addictive disease
  • They consider opioids to be a treatment of last resort and prefer deadly surgeries or spine injections that have a risk of death during surgery or do not work at times.

In addition to the presence of potentially restrictive language, language that can enhance pain management is frequently absent from state policies.

For example, some states do not recognize that pain management is an integral part of the practice of medicine, and need supportive policies that promote full pain treatment.

Key data from:

Pain & Policy Studies Group. Achieving Balance in State Pain Policy: A Progress Report Card. University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center. Madison, Wisconsin, September 2003.

Editorial Language from Dr. Schaller



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